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A Change in Headphones

Anyone who knows me will find the idea of me not wearing a set of headphone at all times a strange one, and for the last 6+ years I have been a faithful purchaser of the Sennheiser PXC range, gently working my way through the range over the years from the 360 to the 550, however when it came to buying a spare battery (after a spate of losing the devils) I found out that the style that I had been used to years had been changed, not a problem, all designs change and grow i’ll just get the new version…. Ah no I won’t… because the new ones are angled and that is a deal breaker, it means I can’t wear them the wrong way round 1 and I cant tuck one behind an ear which I NEED if I am on a client site as there is nothing that gets headphones banned faster than managers not being able to call you when they want.

Requirments

  • Over-ear Design.
  • Bluetooth + Wired.
  • Standard Ports: I fecking hate proprietary ports of all types, you use your own ‘Special’ port so you can sting me for replacement accessories then you are on my s**t list.
  • Vertical alignment: headphones must be vertically aligned, not tilted.
  • No Noise Limiters: I’m not bloody 5 and I Like loud music.

The Choice

I looked at the new Sennheiser PXC but they failed because of the tilt issue raised above and their other suitable models tipped the hipster scale too far, Bose cost too much and just feel like they are not going to last long under the strain of my life and Plantronics are huge and just fall off my head, so enter an outsider in headphones but a venerable name in music: Marshall and their Monitor Bluetooth


MonitorHeadpones01.png


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The Good

  • The Bluetooth is much much stronger than the Sennheiser, I can leave my phone on my desk and wander round the flat with no issue, a great improvement.
  • Snug fit: The headphone are a very tight snug fit, far too tight for my wife, but a positive for me.
  • Sound Quality: richer and far louder than the Sennheiser a huge improvement
  • Duel Input: When working I am always using the Pomodoro timer from my phone via blue tooth, but am often wired in at the same time for things like calls and such, the Marshall headphones handled both of these at the same time which is a pleasant upgrade.

The Bad

  • No Lateral Movement at all: was not really expecting any given their classic design and the absence of an extra join sure makes the whole structure stronger, but without one I can feel the extra pressure when I tuck a headphone behind one ear.
  • Control knob: a poor gimmick, not a knob but a mini joystick which is both fiddly and unintuitive, the volume should have been changed by TURNING the knob!

The Unexpected

  • The replaceable headphone pads are easy to swap: My beard and stubble shreds headphone pads so I was forever replacing the Sennheiser pads, and boy were they a PITA to replace, the Marshal ones are magnetic and nice and easy.
  • The Marshall headphones gave me a total blast from the past to my dads old Pioneer SE-205 which I loved from years ago, true retro.


DadsHeadphones.jpg

The Conclusion

It’s still early days and the Marshals are not quite as easy on my ears as the Sennheisers but the sheer upgrade in nearly all features blows that out of the water, Recommended.


  1. Which I want to do when I want the the cable or buttons on a certain side, or if the Bluetooth signal is having problems with my head!! 

Salesforce and Third Party Calls

This is just a post to help other Salesforce devs who have to face the same repeat question time and time again and the same disbelief in the answer, So they can prove to the client that they are telling the truth.

Dear Sir/Madam
If you are reading this then someone has sent you to this post because you have asked about linking to a third parties data “on the fly” or “in Real time” or “before it opens” on Salesforce and wanting for such data to arrive before showing the page to your users…

the simple answer is this

Salesforce will never make the speed of their website dependent on anyone else!!!

It will never wait for anyone else before opening a page
It will never wait for anyone else before saving a page
It will never wait for anyone else to do ANYTHING

Yes, you can call just about anything with Salesforce, but it will do this asynchronously, so it will make the call to the Third Party, then get on with its own stuff without waiting for an answer.

You just have to write your Salesforce code/page/whatever to deal with the result when it comes back from the Third Party, it’s well documented, there are lots of ways to deal with it: Batch runs, Ajax etc and plenty of neat solutions.. but none of them is “can’t it just wait”

Fin.

Omnicharge

The Omnicharge is the second “mains supply” battery backup that I have backed on kickstarter what seems years ago, and the second one to turn on in the last month

Heralded as far more advanced and adaptable compared to its competitors such as the ChargeTech Plug but it has a far lower output wattage (100Watt), so will it still be any use to me with my monster laptops?

—V The Omnicharge comes in a very nice compact box, minimal packing that survived the air trip perfectly.


Omnicharge01.jpg

The Omnicharge accessories match the amazing build quality of the main unit, with the adaptor tip being of especially high quality for some reason (not that im complaining)


Omnicharge02.jpg

One thing that bit me slightly is that if you are outside of the US you can’t order the accessories afterward so if you were dumb like me and did not order the DC cable or looked at the dirt magnet that is the case with its raised power button and realised a case is a mandatory requirement then poot to you.

When the Omnicharge arrived, I did not have a 90Watt power supply at hand, so I plugged my 130Watt in to see how it handled the extra load expecting a polite cut off message, but NOOOO, everything just worked, I glared at the info screen to see what was going on to discover that the giant power adaptor was ACTUALLY only drawing about 39Watts, let’s hear it for modern adaptive power supplies, this means I can use my P50 with the Omnicharge and my normal charger, sweet!!!, after a bit of experimentation, I found could make the Omnicharge peek at about 81 Watts (4 VM’s running, with me working in 1 of them) this is perfectly usable, I suppose I could have popped the limit if I have done something like video encoding, but that is not the goal.

—V The part of the Omincharge that sets it apart is that it will accept a very very wide range on its input charge, from USB solar panels up to monster power supplies (4.5V to 36V), if this circuit and it matching detailed control screen was built into actual laptops it would be a HUGE game changer but I will take it in any form at the moment.


Omnicharge03.jpg

—V The Omnicharge is only 20.4K mAh, about the size of my laptop battery, meaning it would only add about 2 hours to my battery life, then I had a realisation that I could charge the Omnicharge with the big Anka USB battery I normally carry at the same time it is providing power to the laptop, which should mean it should charge my laptop about 40% longer than it should on its own (on average my laptop takes about 40 Watts).


Omnicharge05.jpg

—V As you can see it works, but as you can also see the temp is rather on the high side, indeed its only 3 degrees short of the cut off temp with its little fan going for all its worth


Omnicharge04.jpg

conclusion The Omnicharge is truly a very smart bit of kit, by far the cleverest battery I have ever owned, again if a laptop provider incorporated this tech into their laptops it would be a massive game changer, but for the time being it is an essential bit of kit… just don’t forget to buy your accessories…

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